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The Goal of Christian Education

June 21, 2009

 My pastor went on a mission trip with our teens for a week so he asked me to fill in for him this Sunday morning.  Since it was Father’s Day,  I chose to use some of Rev. John Piper’s thoughts he shared on March 19, 2000, in a sermon titled, “One Generation Shall Praise Your Works to Another“.

The key verse for the sermon is from:

Psalm 145:4:  “One generation shall praise Your works to another, and shall declare Your mighty acts.”

Piper’s emphasis is on how we teach the next generation about God.  First, he points out that parents have the primary responsibility for the Christian education of their children.  He sites Deuteronomy 6:4-7; Psalm 78:5-7; and Ephesians 6:1-4  as the biblical basis for this position. 

Using Psalm 145:4, Piper points out that Christian education is not just about following Jesus, it should result in exultation in following Jesus.  

He notes that “dry, unemotional, indifferent teaching about God – whether at home or at church – is a half-truth, at best.  It says one thing about God and portrays another thing.  It is inconsistent.  It says that God is great, but teaches as if God is not great.”  

We have to have a vibrant, personal relationship with Jesus that is evident to our children.  As we study God’s Word, commune with Him through prayer, and worship Him daily, it is natural that our conversations with our children should turn to the characteristics of God that we find irresistible and cause us to love Him so deeply. Our teaching should spark a love for God.  

Piper states, “We want to be careful that are chldren don’t have heads that are stocked with truth but whose hearts are cold. He adds, “The aim of (Christian) education is exultation. So let (Christian) education model exultation in the way it is done.” 

The entire sermon is worth listening to.  It is good advice for those who are desiring to: 

“Impart to their children a God-centered, Bible saturated vision for all of life.” (Piper)

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